Thursday, July 6, 2017

Collins Drive -- "Collins Drive"

This self-titled release is from a band based in Atlanta, a trio of my friends. Their music is really good folk-rock, with touches of blues, and I think they make good music. 

The band is made up of Don De Leaumont, guitar and harmonica, lead vocals; Allison Shockley, bass and background vocals; and Michael Satterlee, drums. Production of this release is by Tim Delaney and Collins Drive. 

Since 2013, Collins Drive has two releases: the acoustic EP The Sound of Broken Hearts and the Smell of Home Cookin’ (2016) and this, their debut LP (2017). Collins Drive has earned a steadily growing fan base due to their live performances at such renowned Atlanta venues as Red Light CafĂ©, Moonshadow Tavern, and Smith’s Olde Bar. From Don de Leaumont’s heartfelt and soulful singing and performances of songs such as “Sailor’s Progress”, “I Drive”, and “Ghost Town”, a Collins Drive live performance is something that every lover of good live music can appreciate.

There are nine songs in this release. Don is the principal songwriter. "Cemetery Angel" starts things off with a ripping good story of a woman waiting at a bus stop next to the cemetery. "Drunk On Sunday" contains the wonderful lyric "I'm drunk again on Sunday, all alone and hanging 'round." The next song "Rest Stop For The Weary" is a De Leaumont original from 2009--I call it "the Waffle House song." The full band treatment makes this a much stronger song, with wonderful harmonica. "Prison Story," like all good prison songs, has a touch of Merle Haggard in it, but that is a good thing. Good guitar, and Allison's harmony vocals here add a welcome depth. The next song, "The Devil Is You," may be lyrically the weakest song here, but it still has plenty of charm--strong vocals, good electric guitar and an early Steve Earle outtake feel to it. The next song, "Lying In Our Bed," shows that the band has absorbed the lessons of good folk rock music-making. Lyrics are strong, good guitar and a rock solid rhythm section move this one right along. Reminds me of a Three Dog Night outtake. "I Drive" is another De Leaumont original from his old solo folk-singer days, but like "Rest Stop For The Weary" it comes across better in the band context. "Sailor's Progress" is a wonderful closer--more strong harmonica and Michael's deeply sympathetic drumming and great harmony vocals from Allison. My favorite song on the cd. The last song here is "Ghost Town," a nostalgic look back with strong guitar from Don and another killer harmony vocal from Allison. 

Musically,  Collins Drive is not a complicated band--they just want to bring their favorite kinds of music into one place and create a sound and songs that everyone can connect with. Collins Drive’s songs tell stories and paint pictures of Southern living. There’s nothing complex and there’s no deep, hidden meanings to these songs. They are just little slices of life put into songs that are easy to connect with. 

Good music. And I'm glad to point you, blog-readers, in the direction of good music. You can buy this cd at 

Another bit of good news about Collins Drive--the band, not the cd: Collins Drive has been invited to be a part of Kevn Kinney’s Rocket Shop and Travel Show From the Neighborhood by Kevn Kinney himself. A wonderful honor!!   



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